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Michael Sorens

PowerShell One-Liners: Accessing, Handling and Writing Data

05 June 2014

In the grand finale to Michael Sorens' series of PowerShell one-liners, we come to the handling of data, reading it in and writing it out, whether by files; input/output streams or a database. It shows how it can be done in a variety of formats including CSV, JSON, and XML.

This series is in four parts: This is part 4

Notes on Using the Tables

A command will typically use full names of cmdlets but the examples will often use aliases for brevity. Example: Get-Help has aliases man and help. This has the side benefit of showing you both long and short names to invoke many commands.

Most tables contain either 3 or 4 columns: a description of an action; the generic command syntax to perform that action; an example invocation of that command; and optionally an output column showing the result of that example where feasible.

For clarity, embedded newlines (`n) and embedded return/newline combinations (`r`n) are highlighted as shown.

Many actions in PowerShell can be performed in more than one way. The goal here is to show just the simplest which may mean displaying more than one command if they are about equally straightforward. In such cases the different commands are numbered with square brackets (e.g. "[1]"). Multiple commands generally mean multiple examples, which are similarly numbered.

Most commands will work with PowerShell version 2 and above, though some require at least version 3. So if you are still running v2 and encounter an issue that is likely your culprit.

The vast majority of commands are built-in, i.e. supplied by Microsoft. There are a few sprinkled about that require loading an additional module or script, but their usefulness makes them worth including in this compendium. These "add-ins" will be demarcated with angle brackets, e.g. <<pscx>> denotes the popular PowerShell Community Extensions (http://pscx.codeplex.com/).

This is a multi-part series, covering a variety of input and output techniques: reading from and writing to files; writing and merging the multitude of output streams available in PowerShell (it’s not just stdout and stderr anymore!); file housekeeping operations (move, copy, create, delete); and various other I/O techniques related to CSV, JSON, database, network, and XML.

Be sure to review the earlier parts, too, though:

Part 1 Help, Syntax, Display and Files begins by showing you how to have PowerShell itself help you figure out what you need to do to accomplish a task, covering the help system as well as its handy command-line intellisense. It also examines locations, files, and paths (the basic currency of a shell); key syntactic constructs; ways to cast your output in list, table, grid, or chart form.

Part 2 Variables, Parameters, Properties, and Objects, covers key PowerShell concepts of variables, parameters, properties, and objects. Part 3 explores the two fundamental data structures of PowerShell: the collection (array) and the hash table (dictionary), examining everything from creating, accessing, iterating, ordering, and selecting.

Part 3 Collections, Hashtables, Arrays and Strings also covers converting between strings and arrays, and rounds out with techniques for searching, most commonly applicable to files (searching both directory structures as well as file contents).

Each part of this series is available as both an online reference here at Simple-Talk.com, and as a special wide version here,  as well as a downloadable wallchart in PDF format for those who prefer a printed copy near at hand. Please keep in mind though that this is a quick reference, not a tutorial. So while there are a few brief introductory remarks for each section, there is very little explanation for any given incantation. But do not let that scare you off—jump in and try things! You should find more than a few “aha!” moments ahead of you!

Contents

Reading from Files

When reading a file, your first consideration is whether to read it into a collection or into a single string. For the latter choice, carefully consider how you want line endings to be handled; the first few entries illustrate several line ending options. The next few entries consider multiple files together; you can read them into a string collection with either one file per slot or one line per slot, or into a MatchInfo collection, which provides meta-data about each line. The final few entries consider counting what is in files by lines, words, and characters, with several options available. Many of these entries rely on the sample files (f1.txt and f2.txt) shown early on. Note that the fhex (Format-Hex) cmdlet is part of the PowerShell Community Extensions.

#

Action

Command

Example

Output

1  

Read one file as an array of strings
(line endings stripped)

[1] Get-Content filespec

[2] ${drive:filespec} # must include a drive designator!

$myFileLines = gc foo.txt

$myFileLines = ${c:subdir/foo.txt}

 

2  

Read one file into a single string
(line endings retained, adds final CR/LF)

Get-Content filespec | Out-String

 

"a b`r`ncd" | sc f1.txt # a 2-line file

$a = gc f1.txt |Out-String; $a.Length; $a | fhex -s ascii

9

61 20 62 0D 0A 63 64 0D 0A

3  

Read one file into a single string
(joining with CR/LF so no final CR/LF)

(Get-Content filespec) -join "`r`n"

$a =(gc f1.txt) -join “`r`n”; $a.Length; $a | fhex -s ascii

7

61 20 62 0D 0A 63 64

4  

Read one file into a single string
(joining with spaces)

[string] (Get-Content filespec)

$a = [string](gc f1.txt); $a.Length; $a | fhex -s ascii

6

61 20 62 20 63 64

5  

Read one file into a single string—faster!
(line endings retained, adds final CR/LF)

[1] Get-Content filespec -ReadCount 0 | Out-String

[2] [System.IO.File]::ReadAllText(filespec)

 

[1] $a = Get-Content f1.txt -ReadCount 0 | Out-String; $a.Length; $a | fhex -s ascii

[2] $a = [System.IO.File]::ReadAllText('f1.txt');
$a.Length; $a | fhex -s ascii

9

61 20 62 0D 0A 63 64 0D 0A

6  

Read multiple files as a collection  of MatchInfo objects (one per line)

Get-ChildItem filespec | Select-String ".*"

"a b`r`ncd" | sc f1.txt # a 2-line file

"one`r`n`r`ntwo`r`n" | sc f2.txt #a  4-line file

dir *.txt | sls ".*" | select LineNumber, Filename,Lline

LineNumber Filename Line

---------- -------- ----

         1 f1.txt   a b

         2 f1.txt   cd 

         1 f2.txt   one

         2 f2.txt      

         3 f2.txt   two

         4 f2.txt      

7  

Read multiple files as a collection of lines (strings)

Get-ChildItem filespec | Get-Content

$a = dir *.txt | gc; $a[0]; $a.Count

a b

6

8  

Read multiple files, each file as a single string

 

$a = dir *.txt | % { gc $_ | out-string};

$a[0]; $a.Count

a b

cd

2

9  

Include literal text passage
(a here string)

@"

. . .

"@

$passage = @"

line one

line two

"@

 

10  

Read and execute PowerShell code from text file

Invoke-Expression
("@`"`n" + (gc filespec| Out-String) + '"@')

iex ("@`"`n" + (gc stuff.txt| Out-String) + '"@')

 

11  

Read with different encoding

Get-Content filespec -Encoding encodingType

gc  myfile.txt -encoding UTF8

 

12  

Count non-empty lines in files

dir files | Get-Content |Measure-Object -Line

(dir *.txt | gc | measure -line).Lines

4

13  

Count all lines in files

 

(dir *.txt | gc).Count

6

14  

Count words in files

dir files | Get-Content |Measure-Object -Word

(dir *.txt | gc | measure -word).Words

5

15  

Count characters in files, skipping line breaks

dir files | Get-Content |Measure-Object -Char

(dir *.txt | gc | measure -char).Characters

11

16  

Count characters, skipping all whitespace

dir files | Get-Content
Measure-Object -Char -IgnoreWhiteSpace

(dir *.txt | gc | measure -char -ignore).Characters

10

Writing to Files

Writing to files seem like it should be one of those very trivial, obvious operations. But because PowerShell’s fundamental unit is an object (rather than a string like DOS or Linux) it is not quite so simple. The two main cmdlets Out-File and Set-Content both deliver content to a file but in different formats and different encodings! See John Cook’s 'PowerShell output redirection: Unicode or ASCII?' (http://bit.ly/1iBa4uv) and Oisin Grehan’s 'What’s the difference between Set-Content and Out-File?' (http://bit.ly/1f4zf33) for more details. Then there’s the question of streams; the next section covers that topic.

#

Action

Command

Example

1  

Write each object with CR/LF line endings

(Unicode default; use -Encoding to change)

(Works only with FileSystem provider)

[1] any | Out-File -FilePath filespec

[2] any > filespec

ls | Out-File \­tmp\­file.txt

ls > \­tmp\­file.txt

2  

Append to end of file(Unicode default)

[1] any | Out-File -FilePath filespec -append

[2] any >> filespec

 

3  

Write each object.ToString() with CR/LF
(ASCII default; use -Encoding to change)

[1] any | Set-Content filespec

[2] ${drive:filespec} = any

ls | Set-Content \­tmp\­file.txt

${c:\­tmp\­file.txt}  = ls

4  

Append string content to end of file

(ASCII default; faster than Out-File)

any | Add-Content filespec

 

5  

Convert Unicode to ASCII without temp file

 (Get-Content filespec) | Set-Content filespec

(gc foo.txt) | sc foo.txt

6  

Write to file with specified line ending (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/10215589/115690)

$writer = [system.io.file]::CreateText(filespec); $writer.NewLine = lineEndingString;
any | % { $writer.WriteLine($_) };
$writer.Close()

$writer = [system.io.file]::CreateText("temp.txt");
$writer.NewLine = "`n";
gc file.txt | % { $writer.WriteLine($_) };
$writer.Close()

7  

Detect file encoding

Get-FileEncoding filespec

<<code from http://stackoverflow.com/a/9121679/115690>>

 

Basic Writing Streams

Unlike DOS or Linux, PowerShell goes beyond the basic stdout and stderr streams to introduce several more that may be written to or redirected as desired. See 'About redirection' (http://bit.ly/1aVRAQK) for details.  The three redirection columns act as follows: Write creates or overwrites a file; Append creates or appends to a file; Merge joins the specified stream with stdout.

#

Action

Command

Write

Append

Merge

Example

1  

Write to console (bypasses stdout) - cannot be redirected!

[1] Write-Host string

[2] [console]::WriteLine(string)

NA

NA

NA

write-host "hello world"

[console]::WriteLine("hello world")

2  

Write to output stream (i.e. stdout)

This is implicit if omitted, so usually not needed.

Write-Output

> 

>> 

NA

write-output "hello world"

echo "hello world"

"hello world"

3  

Write to file (Unicode) and to stdout

Tee-Object

NA

NA

NA

ps | tee output.txt

4  

Write to error stream (i.e. stderr)

Write-Error

2>

2>>

2>&1

write-error "problem with …"

5  

Write to warning stream

Write-Warning

3>

3>>

3>&1

write-warning "NB: null detected…"

6  

Write to verbose stream

Requires $VerbosePreference or -Verbose to manifest

Write-Verbose

4>

4>>

4>&1

write-verbose "parameters: a, b, c"

7  

Write to debug  stream

Requires $DebugPreference or -Debug to manifest

Write-Debug

5>

5>>

5>&1

write-debug "xyz"

8  

Redirect all streams

NA

*>

*>>

*>&1

 

Move, Copy, Create, Delete

#

Action

Command

Example

1  

Copy file or folder

Copy-Item source target

cp -Recurse C:\­test \­\­remotesys\­test

2  

Copy files from a tree and flatten hierarchy

Get-ChildItem spec -Recurse | Copy-Item -dest target

gci *.txt -recurse | Copy-Item -destination c:\­target

3  

Copy files from a tree and maintain hierarchy

Copy-Item  -Recurse -Filter spec  source target

Copy-Item  -Recurse -Filter *.txt  -path c:\­source -dest c:\­target

4  

Rename file or folder

Rename-Item oldName newName

rni foo.txt bar.txt

5  

Move file (same drive or between drives)

Move-Item source destination

mv c:\­foo.txt d:\­temp

6  

Move directory on the same drive

Move-Item source destination

mv c:\­tmp\­somedir  c:\­other\­somedir

7  

Move directory to a different drive

Copy-Item - recurse source target;
Remove-Item -recurse source

cp -r c:\­some\­dir d:\­some\­dir; rm -r c:\­some\­dir

8  

Create file

[1] New-Item path - ItemType file -Value "text"

[2] echo " text " | Set-Content path

[1] ni foo.txt - ItemType file -Value "Hello world"

[2] echo "Hello world" | Set-Content foo.txt

9  

Create empty directory

New-Item path -ItemType directory

mkdir foo.txt - ItemType directory

10  

Delete file

Remove-Item path

rm foo.txt

11  

Delete folder

Remove-Item path -recurse

rmdir -r .\­some\­tempdir

12  

Empty a file

Clear-Content path

clc foo.txt

13  

Empty a folder

Remove-Item path\­*.*

 

Convert, Combine, and More

Beyond basic reading and writing, here are some notions on other file manipulations. Note that processing large files deserves special consideration—for example, while Get-Content can be very fast (with -ReadCount 0), the PowerShell pipeline is not as peppy, so avoid it—see 'Speeding Up Your Scripts!' (http://bit.ly/1mLI8Bp).

#

Action

Command

Example

1  

Convert line endings (Windows to Unix)

ConvertTo-UnixLineEnding <<pscx>>

 

2  

Convert line endings (Unix to Windows)

ConvertTo-WindowsLineEnding <<pscx>>

 

3  

Append to start of file

. { any; cat filespec } | Set-Content newFilespec

.{ cat addstuff.txt; cat stuff.txt } | sc newstuff.txt

4  

Append to end of file

Add-Content filespec -value text

ac -path *.txt -value "END"

5  

Concatenate multiple files

Get-Content filespec-array

[1] cat example1.txt, example2.txt > examples.txt

[2] cat example*.txt > allexamples.txt

[3] gci filespec | Get-Content | Set-Content .\­all.txt

6  

Concatenate 2 files

[1] Get-Content filespecB |Add-Content -Path filespecA

[2] Add-Content -path filespecA -value (Get-Content filespecB)

gc .\­file2.txt| ac  -Path .\­file1.txt

7  

Read a large file (see http://bit.ly/1mLI8Bp)

Get-Content filespec -ReadCount 0

 

8  

Retrieve first n lines of a large file (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/11369924/115690)

Get-Content filespec -TotalCount n

 

9  

Remove first n lines of a file(see http://stackoverflow.com/a/2076557/115690)

[1] ${C:filespec} = ${C:filespec } | select -skip count

[2] (gc filespec | select -Skip count) | sc filespec

 

10  

Display new input from end of a file

Get-FileTail -Wait filespec <<pscx>>

tail -Wait c:\­usr\­tmp\­logfile.txt

11  

Trim all lines in a file

(Get-Content filespec)| % { $_.trim() } |
Set-Content filespec

(gc $myFile)| % {$_.trim()} | sc $ myFile

12  

Write compressed archive

[1] Write-Zip <<pscx>>

[2] Write-Gzip <<pscx>>

[3] Write-Tar <<pscx>>

 

13  

Hex Dump

Format-Hex filespec <<pscx>>

fhex c:\­usr\­tmp\­file.dat

Patterned Data: CSV and More

For an in-depth treatment on getting data in and out of PowerShell, peruse my article 'PowerShell Data Basics: File-Based Data' (http://bit.ly/19W5Cnn) covering all the items below plus fixed-width fields, ragged-right text, multi-line record input and more.

#

Action

Command

Example

Output

1  

Convert CSV data to objects

[1] Import-Csv filespec

[2] any | ConvertTo-Csv

@'

Shape,Color,Count

Square,Green,4

Rectangle,,12

'@ | ConvertFrom-Csv

Shape     Color Count

-----     ----- -----

Square    Green 4

Rectangle       12

2  

Convert CSV data to objects with delimiter

[1] Import-Csv file -Delimiter char

[2] any | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter char

@'

Shape+Color+Count

Square+Green+4

Trapezoid+Black+100

'@ | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter '+'

Shape     Color Count

-----     ----- -----

Square    Green 4   

Trapezoid Black 100 

3  

Convert CSV data to objects with unprintable delimiter

[1] Import-Csv file -Delimiter "$([char]hexCode)"

[2] any | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter "$([char]hexCode)"

@"

Shape`tColor`tCount

Square`tGreen`t4

Trapezoid`tBlack`t100

"@ | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter "$([char]0x09)"

Shape     Color Count

-----     ----- -----

Square    Green 4   

Trapezoid Black 100 

4  

Convert CSV data to objects with multi-character delimiter

Get-Content file| foreach { $_ -replace delimiter,[char]uncommonChar } |
ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter uncommonChar

Get-Content file.dat| % { $_ -replace ".1234.",[char]0x06 } | ConvertFrom-Csv -Delimiter 0x06

 

5  

Convert CSV data to objects with external headers

[1] Import-Csv file -Header field1, field2, …

[2] any | ConvertTo-Csv -Header field1, field2, …

@'

Square,Green,4

Trapezoid,Black,100

'@ | ConvertFrom-Csv -Header Shape, Color, Count

Shape     Color Count

-----     ----- -----

Square    Green 4   

Trapezoid Black 100 

6  

Convert objects to CSV data

(see http://bit.ly/1aZfgDN)

Export-CSV or ConvertTo-Csv

Get-Date | Select Hour,Minute,Second | ConvertTo-Csv

#TYPE System.DateTime

"Hour","Minute","Second"

"19","5","27"

7  

Convert patternable data to objects (i.e. not regular enough to simply specify a single delimiter but definable with regex)

ImportWith-Regex

<<code from http://bit.ly/19W5Cnn>>

#Assume file.dat contains:

george jetson      5

warren buffett   123

horatioalger     -99

$regex = "^(?<FName>.{7})(?<LName>.{10})(?<Id>.{3})$"

ImportWith-Regex file.dat $regex

Id  FName     LName 

--  -----     ----- 

  5 george    jetson   

123 warren    buffett  

-99 horatio   alger   

8  

Convert objects to JSON

any | ConvertTo-Json

Get-Date | Select-Object -Property Hour,Minute,Second | ConvertTo-Json

{   "Hour":  19,

    "Minute":  0,

    "Second":  44

}

9  

Convert from JSON to objects

json | ConvertFrom-Json

'{ "Hour":19, "Minute":0, "Second":44 }' | ConvertFrom-Json

Hour Minute Second

---- ------ ------

  19      0     44

Network Basics

From simple network (UNC) paths to full-blown web-scraping and file downloading, here are the key cmdlets to get you going.

#

Action

Command

Example

1  

Display current location (non-UNC paths only)

[1] Get-Location

[2] $pwd

[3] $pwd.Path

same

2  

Display current location (UNC or non-UNC paths)

$pwd.ProviderPath

cd \­\­localhost\­c$; $pwd.ProviderPath

3  

Display UNC path of current location

$pwd.Drive.DisplayRoot

same

4  

List all mapped drive ids and their UNC paths

Get-WmiObject win32_logicaldisk -filter "drivetype=4" | select DeviceId, ProviderName

same

5 

Display UNC path for a mapped drive

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='drive' ") .ProviderName

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='H:' ").ProviderName

6 

Display server name of mapped drive

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='drive' ") .ProviderName.Split('\­')[2]

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='T:' " ).ProviderName.Split('\­')[2]

7  

Determine if a file system drive is a mapped drive

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='drive' ") -ne $null

(gwmi win32_logicaldisk -filter "deviceid='E:' ") -ne $null

8 

List all free drive letters (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/17548038/115690)

ls function:[a-z]: -name | where {-not (get-psdrive $_[0] -ea 0)}

same

9 

Open URL in default browser

Start-Process -FilePath url

Start-Process http://www.cnn.com

10

Encode HTML

[System.Web.HttpUtility]::HtmlEncode(string)

[System.Web.HttpUtility]::HtmlEncode('something <something else>')

11 

Decode HTML

[System.Web.HttpUtility]::HtmlDecode(string)

[System.Web.HttpUtility]::HtmlDecode('something &lt;something else&gt;')

12  

Get web page content (a la wget or webget)

 (Invoke-WebRequest uri).Content

$page = (Invoke-WebRequest http://www.xyz.com).Content

13  

Get multiple files from the web

Start-BitsTransfer  -Source uri -Destination path

Start-BitsTransfer -Source http://s01/testdir/*.* -Destination c:\­testdir\­

14  

Web scraping
<<Html Agility Pack http://bit.ly/1kuhBHM>>

Add-Type -Path .\­HtmlAgilityPack.dll; $doc = New-Object HtmlAgilityPack.HtmlDocument; $page = (Invoke-WebRequest uri).Content; $status = $doc.LoadHtml($page); $items = $doc.DocumentNode.SelectNodes(xpath)

Specify a value for uri and for xpath.

Database

Install the sqlps module (installed automatically with SS2012), then import the module (recommend using  -DisableNameChecking due to non-standard names). Once installed you will have a SQL Server provider (Get-PSProvider) and a SQL Server data store (Get-PSDrive) available, allowing navigating the data space with familiar commands.

The last two entries in the table below are perhaps the most intriguing: converting between PowerShell and SQL Server. From SQL Server to PowerShell is simple; the other way is less so. Chad Miller provides an outstanding foundation with his cmdlets Out-DataTable, Add-SqlTable, and Write-DataTable (see references). I added a few bells and whistles and provided a convenience wrapper function that composes all three cmdlets into one: the Out-SqlTable which I reference below.

#

Action

Command

Example

1  

Go to root of SQL Server data store

Set-Location SQLSERVER:\­

same

2  

Go to root of  DB objects

Set-Location SQLSERVER:\­SQL

same

3  

List instance names on machine

Get-ChildItem SQLSERVER:\­SQL\­machine

ls SQLSERVER:\­SQL\­localhost

4  

List databases on selected instance of machine

Get-ChildItem SQLSERVER:\­­SQL\­machine\­­instance\­Databases

ls SQLSERVER:\­­SQL\­localhost\­­SQLEXPRESS\­Databases

5  

List tables in selected database

Get-ChildItem SQLSERVER:\­SQL\­machine\­instance\­Databases\­database\­Tables

ls SQLSERVER: \­SQL\­localhost\­DEFAULT\­Databases\­sandbox\­Tables

6  

Create mapped drive for shortcut path

New-PSDrive -Name name -PSProvider SQLSERVER -Root root

mount -name sandboxDB -PSProvider SQLSERVER -Root SQLSERVER:\­SQL\­localhost\­DEFAULT\­Databases\­sandbox

7  

List tables in selected database with shortcut

Get-ChildItem mappedDrive:Tables

ls sandboxDB:\­Tables

8  

Get properties of DB object

Get-Item databasePath | Get-Member -Type Properties

gi sandboxDB:\­Tables | gm -type properties

9  

List subset of tables using SMO property

 

gci sandboxDB:\­Tables | where {$_.Schema -eq "dbo"}

10  

Generate create scripts for all tables using SMO method

 

gci sandboxDB:\­Tables | % { $_.Script() }

11  

Create script for particular table

 

(gci sandboxDB:\­Tables | ? { $_.name -eq "temp1" }).script()

12  

Generate create scripts for each table using SMO method sending output to one file

 

gci sandboxDB:\­Tables | % { $_.Script() | Out-File  C:\­tmp\­CreateTables.sql -append  }

13  

Invoke query (with default context)

cd SQLSERVER:\­SQL\­machine\­instance (or lower)
 Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query tsqlCommandString

Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query "SELECT DB_NAME()"

14  

Invoke query with server specified

Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query tsqlCommandString -Server machine\­instance

 

15  

Convert DB data to PS objects

[1] Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query tsqlCommandString |Out-GridView

[2] Invoke-Sqlcmd -Query tsqlCommandString |Format-Table

[1] Invoke-Sqlcmd "select * from Table1" | ogv

[2] Invoke-Sqlcmd "select * from Table1" | ft -auto

16  

Convert PS objects to DB data

any | Out-SqlTable options

<<code from http://bit.ly/1bjIFe1>>

ps | select ProcessName, Handle | Out-SqlTable -TableName "processes" -DropExisting -RowId "MyId"

XML Data

There is much to say about XML data access in PowerShell. One very nice feature is that you can use either XPath notation or object notation to access nodes! This topic does not really lend itself to table entries here, though, so see 'PowerShell Data Basics: XML' (http://bit.ly/1f54D2T) for the full story.

#

Action

Command

Example

Output

1  

Convert literal text to XML

[1] [xml] variable = any

[2] variable = [xml] any

[xml]$xml=@"

<root>

<first><more>foobar</more></first>

<second>data</second>

</root>

"@;

$xml.SelectNodes("//*") | Select -Expand Name

root

first

more

second

2  

Convert file contents to XML

[xml]$variable = Get-Content filespec

[xml]$xml = Get-Content mystuff.xml

 

3  

Access XML nodes with XPath

variable.SelectNodes(xpath)

$xml.SelectNodes("//first[more]")

more

----

foobar

4  

Access XML nodes with object notation

variable.nodeName.nodeName…

$xml.root.first

more

----

foobar

5  

Pretty-print XML

[1] any | Format-Xml <<pscx>>

[2] Format-Xml filespec <<pscx>>

 

 

6  

Transform XML with XSLT

Convert-Xml xmlFilespec xsltFilespec <<pscx>>

 

 

7  

Test XML for well-formedness and validity

Test-Xml filespec

 

 

Conclusion

You made it to the end of part 4—almost 400 recipes later!—which is the end of the series (at least for now). As usual, I will conclude with my tongue-in-cheek disclaimer: while I have been over the recipes presented numerous times to weed out errors and inaccuracies, I think I may have missed one. If you locate it, please share your findings in the comments below. And enjoy your PowerShell adventures!

 

Michael Sorens

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Michael Sorens is passionate about software to be more productive, evidenced by his open source libraries in several languages (see his API bookshelf) as well as SqlDiffFramework (a DB comparison tool for heterogeneous systems including SQL Server, Oracle, and MySql). With degrees in computer science and engineering he has worked the gamut of companies from Fortune 500 firms to Silicon Valley startups over the last 25 years or so. Current passions include PowerShell, .NET, SQL, and XML technologies (see his full brand page). Spreading the seeds of good design wherever possible, he enjoys sharing knowledge via writing (see his full list of articles), teaching, and StackOverflow. Like what you have read? Connect with Michael on LinkedIn and Google +

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Subject: I'm gonna have to save this for later review, but
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at 11:10 AM
Message: The links to the different parts are inconsistent across the series.

The link to part 1 from part 4 is broken; could you make all the cross referencing links consistent across the series, please? Or maybe a master post listing each part with a link to each.

In each it might also be handy to label it as e.g., 1/4 or part 1 of 4

Thanks for the articles!<.r>
Ed: Now fixed.

Subject: The link to part 1
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 6:20 AM
Message: The link to part 1 is https://www.simple-talk.com/sysadmin/powershell/powershell-one-liners-help,-syntax,-display-and--files/

 

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