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Richard Morris

Paul Randal: Geek of the Week

Paul Randal and Kimberly Tripp, together with their small team of experts at SQLSkills.com, dominate the high-end training and consultancy for SQL Server. They help to maintain this domination by virtue of their popular public speaking, and writing. We sent Richard Morris to find out a bit more about Paul, his views about SQL Server, his lifestyle, ambitions and plans. Read more...

Richard Morris

David Heinemeier Hansson: Geek of the Week

Ruby on Rails, the open-source web application framework, grew out of David Heinemeier Hansson's work on Basecamp at 37Signals. It is now so popular with developers that it has been shipped with Mac OSX since 2007, and has a dedicated Windows following. Rail's focus on software engineering patters and Agile philosophy were so intriguing that we decided that DHH should be Geek of the Week. Read more...

Richard Morris

Bill Baker: Geek of the Week

Bill Baker had a considerable influence on the way that SQL Server evolved to deliver reporting services and business intelligence. Until 2008, Bill Baker headed the Data Warehouse Product Unit within the SQL Server product development group. His team designed Analysis Services, Integration services, Data Transformation Services and the Admin tools that ship with SQL Server. Read more...

Richard Morris

Jeffrey Snover: Geek of the Week

PowerShell has radically improved the ease of monitoring and adminstering Windows-based servers, and automating routine processes. The visionary leader of this project is Jeffery Snover, who is now Lead Architect for both Windows Server and System Center Datacenter. Read more...

Richard Morris

Bertrand Meyer: Geek of the Week

Bertrand Meyer, the author of 'Object-oriented Software Construction', renowned teacher, and designer of the Eiffel programming language, believes in simple elegant computer languages. Java, C# and Python all owe much to his pioneering work with Eiffel. He was also deeply involved with .NET from the outset. Read more...

Richard Morris

Meredith Ryan: DBA of the Day

Meredith Ryan – DBA at the Bell Group –was elected by judges and the SQL Server community as the Exceptional DBA of 2012. So who is Meredith, and how did she become a DBA? What makes her exceptional at her work? We sent Richard Morris to investigate. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Niklaus Wirth

When looking for a suitable Geek of the Week, we wondered whether a suitable candidate might be the man who pioneered structured programming, invented modular programming and who wrote one of the first languages with features for Object-oriented programming. Yes, for a second time, Niklaus Wirth, gets the accolade of 'Geek of the Week' and shows that he is still the radical thinker with strong view about computer languages. Read more...

Richard Morris

Ron Gruner: Geek of the Week

Ron Gruner helped to crate some of the best of Data General's Minicomputers, and then co-founded Alliant, producer of the first parallel supercomputer that was able to decompose programs to run them in parallel. He then became an internet pioneer, who created the successful Shareholder.com site, and is now working on Sky Analytics for benchmarking the costs and expenses of law firms. Read more...

Richard Morris

Kohsuke Kawaguchi: Geek of the Week

Jenkins, formerly called Hudson, is an open-source server-based Continuous Integration tool that works with all the major Source Control Management (SCM) tools including TFS, and can even script in PowerShell. It is clever software written by a clever geek, Kohsuke Kawaguchi. Read more...

Richard Morris

Peldi Guilizzoni: Geek of the Week

Peldi is one of the most likeable of the new hybrid IT generation; part entrepreneur, part geek. Balsamiq is Peldi's creation, a tool for creating mockups of software. Balsamiq has shown what a good framework Adobe Air is, and how successful single-purpose software that completely fills a need can be. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Tom Igoe

Arduino is cheap and simple way that desktop computers can monitor the physical world, and control devices. It is an open-source platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a software development environment, ideal for teaching. We decided to find out more from Tom Igoe, from Arguino's team. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Ola Bini

Ola Bini is one of the core developers for JRuby, and creator of the JvYAML and RbYAML projects. He is also well known for his work on promoting YAML as an alternative markup to XML. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Don Syme

With the arrival of F# 3.0 Microsoft announced a wide range of improvements such as type providers that made F# a viable alternative to their other .NET languages as a general purpose workhorse. So what exactly are type providers, and why are they a killer reason for using F#? Why should we be considering F# for data-rich applications? To find out, we caught up with Don Syme, F#'s creator, to ask him about the latest developments in F# 3.0 and canvas his views on functional programming in general. Read more...

Richard Morris

Chuck Moore on the Lost Art of Keeping It Simple

Chuck Moore is still the radical thinker of Information Technology, After an astonishing career designing languages (e.g. FORTH), browser-based computers, CAD systems and CPUs, he is now energetically designing extremely low-powered 'green' multi-processor chips for embedded systems. Behind everything he does is a radical message: 'Embrace the entire problem, Keep it simple'. Read more...

Richard Morris

Michael Pilato: Geek of the Week

For a large number of .NET developers, Subversion is Source Control. The book they go to to find out how to use it is O'Reilly's 'Version Control with Subversion'. Both Subversion and the book owe a great deal to the Subversion open source development team, including Michael Pilato of CollabNet, who has worked on the project for many years, almost since the project was founded in 2000 by Collabnet. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Linus Torvalds

For Windows programmers, Linus Torvalds work has suddenly become relevant. No, we don't mean Linux, but Git. This distributed Source Control system now works sweetly as a nut on Windows. We contacted Linus for a second interview; this time to talk mainly about Git, but also to catch up with his thoughts about computer languages. Read more...

Richard Morris

Jez Humble: Geek of the Week

Jez Humble and David Farley achieved fame through a book that tackled the least glamorous but most intricate part of the application development cycle, Deployment. It was no accident that the book achived so much attention, since it was a lively and iconoclastic take on a vital but neglected aspect of development upon which the ultimate success of software projects so often depend. We found Jez to be an interesting guy, too! Read more...

Richard Morris

Benjamin Pollack: Geek of the Week

Benjamin Pollack is well known for his work on Fog Creek Copilot, and Kiln. He is famous amongst young geeks for his role in a documentary film and website 'Aardvark'd: 12 Weeks with Geeks', which plotted his internship with Fog Creek back in 2005. Read more...

Richard Morris

Eric Sink: Geek of the Week

Eric Sink became well-known for his work with the Spyglass browser, which was acquired by Microsoft and morphed into Internet Explorer. Since then, he has succeeded at the difficult double-act of combining programming and the software business. He is living proof that it is possible to master both skills. Read more...

Richard Morris

Steve Furber: Geek of the Week

Professor Stephen Byram Furber CBE, FRS, FREng was one of the designers of the BBC Micro and the ARM 32-bit RISC microprocessor. The result of his work, the ARM chip, is in most mobile phones, calculators and other low-power electronic devices in the world. At the University of Manchester, he is working on the radical SpiNNaker project which could one day change the whole nature of the personal computer. Read more...

Richard Morris

Rob Pike: Geek of the Week

Rob Pike's contribution to Information Technology has been profound, both through the famous books he co-authored with Brian Kernighan, and his contribution to distributed systems, window systems and concurrency in Unix. Now at Google, his creative skills are in full flow, particularly, in collaboration with Ken Thompson, in the exciting Go language, a grown-up, but radical, C with concurrency. Read more...

Richard Morris

Roland Waddilove: Geek of the Week

A whole generation of British geeks owe a debt of gratitude to Roland Waddilove. He is a journalist with a rare knack of being able to explain complex technical ideas in a very simple way. Many successful developers cut their teeth many years ago on an Atari, Electron, Sinclair or Amstrad computer, poring over the technical articles of Roland Waddilove in well-thumbed magazines Read more...

Richard Morris

Jorge Segarra: DBA of the Day

Jorge Segarra, also known on Twitter as 'SQLChicken', was one of the finalists of the Exceptional DBA award this year. He lives and works in Tampa, Florida. As well as working as a DBA, he's a Hypervisor for the PASS Virtualization Virtual Chapter and chapter leader of the PASS Professional Development Virtual Chapter, and has also co-authored the book from Apress “Pro SQL Server 2008 Policy-Based Management“. Read more...

Richard Morris

Kevan Riley: DBA of the Day

When the ASK.SQLServerCentral.com site started, something magical happened. A band of DBA and developer volunteers got together to ensure the very best quality of questions and answers about SQL Server. Kevan was one of them. Through a couple of happy chances, the community discovered an exceptional DBA, and a source of valuable advice. Read more...

Richard Morris

Dr Byron Cook: Geek of the Week

On moving to Cambridge University after developing the SLAM model checker used by Microsoft's Static Driver Verifier, Dr Bryan Cook's new computer locked up with what turned out to be a faulty driver. The result was TERMINATOR, the first practical tool for automatically proving that any application would always terminate. Read more...

Richard Morris

Ted Krueger: DBA of the Day

Ted Krueger is well known for his 'Less-Than Dot' website. He is a SQL Server MVP who has been working in development and database administration for over 13 years. He was one of the finalists to the Exceptional DBA of the Year Award for 2010 Read more...

Richard Morris

Carl Franklin and Richard Campbell: Geeks of the Week

Learning .NET doesn't have to be dull: not when there are geeks like like Carl Fraklin and Richard Campbell with the wit and ability to talk interestingly about it. If you don't listen to their podcasts on .NET topics, then maybe you're missing out on a great way of whiling away the time spent commuting between home and work. Read more...

Richard Morris

Josef Richberg: DBA of the Day

As the winner of the Exceptional DBA Awards 2010 is announced, we take a moment to recognize last year's winner Josef Richberg. We sent Richard Morris to meet Josef to find out what has happened in the past year, and if life has changed for the Exceptional DBA of 2009. Read more...

Richard Morris

Grady Booch: Geek of the Week

Grady Booch is probably best known for being one of the original developers of the Unified Modelling Language (UML). He defined much of the way we go about the Object-Oriented analysis of applications. He's also interesting to chat to about programming, as Richard Morris found out. Read more...

Richard Morris

Roy Fielding: Geek of the Week

Almost certainly, you use the results of Roy Fielding's work every day. After all, he was one of the principal authors of the HTTP specification, was active in developing HTML and the URI, defined REST, and remains one of the directors of the Apache Software Foundation, having co-founded the Apache HTTP Server that runs the bulk of the words webservers. Read more...

Richard Morris

Don Woods: Geek of the Week

Of all the original thinkers in IT, few are as original or as amusing as Don Woods. INTERCAL, Colossal Cave Adventure, the Jargon file and the New Hackers' Dictionary all owe much to his irresistible brand of humour, and his immense knowledge and experience in IT. Read more...

Richard Morris

Tom Kyte: Geek of the Week

Tom Kyte's contribution to the AskTom column and site over ten years has been outstanding. Much of what he says has relevance to all relational databases. His views are straightforward, the discussions he provokes are lively: Not only does he know a frightening amount about both Oracle and SQL Server, but he's also refreshing to listen to. Read more...

Richard Morris

Erland Sommarskog: DBA of the Day

Erland is best known for his famous SQL Server site http://www.sommarskog.se/. It is plain, it has eight articles in it, it is short on jokes: However, it is hugely popular and one of the great 'essential' SQL Server sites. We sent Richard Morris to find out more about Erland, and he discovered a diligent and energetic teacher and mentor in the SQL Server Community. Read more...

Richard Morris

Brian Kernighan: Geek of the Week

When anyone mentions 'Kernighan and Ritchie', we all know what they are referring to: that brief book that introduced the C language to programmers, and set a high standard for all subsequent books on computer languages. Now over thirty years later it is still in print and translated into over 20 languages, being required reading for undergraduates. We sent Richard Morris to interview Professor Brian Kernighan Read more...

Richard Morris

Chuck Esterbrook: Geek of the Week

The Cobra Programming Language is an exciting new general-purpose Open-source language for .NET or Mono, which features unit tests, contracts, ‘informative’ asserts, generics, Compile-time nil/null tracking, lambda expressions, closures, list comprehensions and generators. Even if it had been developed by a team, it would have been a remarkable achievement. The surprise is that it is the work of one programmer with help from a group of users. We sent Richard to find out more about that one programmer. Read more...

Richard Morris

Cristina Cifuentes: Geek of the Week

Cristina Cifuentes was already well-known for her work on decompilers before she took the development of Sun Microsystems 'Parfait' bug-checking application for C/C++ source. Unlike the classic 'Lint', Parfait is careful about avoiding false positives. What is more, it is fast, and popular with programmers. Read more...

Richard Morris

Doug Crockford: Geek of the Week

Doug Crockford is the man behind JavaScript Object Notation (JSON). He is a well-known critic of XML and guides the development of Javascript on the ECMA Standards Committee, as well as being the senior JavaScript architect at Yahoo! He is also the author of the popular 'JavaScript: The Good Parts'. Richard Morris was dispatched to ask him which the good parts were. Read more...

Richard Morris

Rich Hickey: Geek of the Week

With Clojure soon to be ported to the .NET framework, as ClojureCLR, we felt that the time had come to see what the fuss was all about amongst the Java Geeks. We sent Richard Morris to find out from the creator of Clojure, Rich Hickey. Read more...

Richard Morris

Bruce Schneier: Geek of the Week

If one were to close one's eyes and imagine a BT Executive, one would never conjure up Bruce Schneier. He is one of the greatest experts in cryptography, and a well-known mathematician. He even got a brief mention in thebook 'The Da Vinci Code'. He also remains an outspoken and articulate critic of the way that security is actually implemented in applications, as Richard Morris found out when we dispatched him to interview him. Read more...

Richard Morris

Peter Norvig: Geek of the Week

It's likely that you are already using the results of Peter Norvig's work every day, if you search the internet with Google. One of the smartest moves that Google ever made was to hire the man who not only was a leading expert in Artificial Intelligence, but was an expert application developer. Now he leads a team of over a hundred researchers to discover better ways of handling issues such as the machine-understanding and machine-translation of language in the quest for semantic search. Read more...

Richard Morris

Don Syme: Geek of the Week

It came as a surprise to many of us when Microsoft pulled from it's hat a rabbit in the form of an exciting, radical, language that offers an effective alternative to the Object-oriented orthodoxy. The creative force behind this language, F#, turns out to be a brilliant Cambridge-based Australian called Don Syme, already well known for his work on generics in .NET. F# has taken the specialised power of ML and OCaml and developed a versatile general-purpose .NET language. We sent Richard Morris across the road to investigate. Read more...

Richard Morris

Robin Milner: Geek of the Week

Although Robin Milner is best known for creating ML, which has evolved into Microsoft's new F# language, he would, had this never happened, still be renowned for developing LCF, one of the first tools for automated theorem proving, and for calculus of communicating systems (CCS), a theoretical framework for analyzing concurrent systems. Richard Morris went along to find out more. Read more...

Richard Morris

Itzik Ben-Gan: DBA of the Day

Itzik Ben-Gan, who was one of our first Geeks of the Week in 2005, is so well known and popular because he has all the instincts of a database developer and teacher, as well as being a certified DBA. His books and articles on Transact SQL are memorable because they relish the techniques of solving practical problems with SQL. His classes have been described as 'the mental equivalent of drinking Red Bull'. We sent Richard Morris to savour the adrenaline kick. Read more...

Richard Morris

Guillaume Laforge: Geek of the Week

Guillaume Laforge is the project manager for the development of Groovy and Grails, and the creative force behind it. He has since shown, in a number of projects, how veratile Grails can be for the rapid development of web applications. Groovy is a dynamic language in a similar mould to Java, but with a malleable syntax and a greater economy. We asked Richard Morris to ask Guillaume about Groovy and Grails; and their context in the new wave of dynamic languages. Read more...

Richard Morris

Donald Knuth: Geek of the Week

Donald Knuth is an extraordinary man. As well as inventing 'Literate Programming' and writing the most important textbook on programming algorithms, he is also famous for designing and programming one of the most widely-used digital typesetting systems ever, even designing the fonts that went with it. He also pioneered the use of 'Open-source' software. Knuth is a man of engaging charm and enthusiasms who combines a knowledge of history, music, art and mathematics with a unique insight into the art of computer programming. Read more...

Richard Morris

Simon Peyton Jones: Geek of the Week

Simon Peyton Jones is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research’s lab in Cambridge. Although he is best known as the developer of the definitive Haskell Compiler, his influence on the development of the new generation of functional languages such as F# has been profound. He has also been in the forefront of the development of parallel programming using Software Transactional memory. We sent Richard Morris across the road to find out more. Read more...

Richard Morris

Interview with the Scary DBA - Grant Fritchey

For our first feature on working DBAs and their lives, we chose Grant Fritchey, the self-styled Scary DBA, who has been so successful in the past year with his books and presentations. How does he manage to pack so much into his life? we sent Richard Morris to find out. Read more...

Richard Morris

Tucker Taft: Geek of the Week

What do military networks and a 19th Century Difference Engine have in common? Tucker Taft; industry leader in compiler construction and programming language design, and SoftCheck CTO. Tucker has taught disseminated his encyclopaedic knowledge at Harvard University, and has worked tirelessly to improve the Ada language for 20 years. We sent Richard Morris to find out about more about the man and his two-decade-long project. Read more...

Richard Morris

Geek of the Week: Joe Celko

Joe Celko, the Database Developer and writer from Austin Texas, is not a man to mince his words. His encyclopedic grasp of SQL and relational Databases in general comes from a mix of academic knowledge and practical experience. In discussions he can be fascinating, cantankerous, amusing and satirical, but he is never ever dull, as Richard Morris found out when we sent him to interview the SQL language's most famous advocate. Read more...

Richard Morris

Stephen Curtis Johnson: Geek of the Week

Stephen Johnson, one of the team that developed UNIX, can claim to be the man who originally wrote the software tool that has been the longest continuously advertised and marketed software tool ever, since 1984. Lint for C and C++ was not his only success, though. He wrote YACC too, still used after 35 years, the Portable C Compiler, and possibly his greatest achievement, the MATLAB compiler. Read more...

Richard Morris

Walter Bright: Geek of the Week

After developing the first native C++ compiler, the Zortech C++, and writing the Symantec Java compiler, Walter Bright created D (C Done right). He has written a number of commercial compilers for a number of languages, and D is the culmination of everything he has learned in over twenty years. As a result of all this experience, he has interesting views on compilers and languages. Read more...

Richard Morris

Alan Kay: Geek of the Week

The development of Object-oriented programming, the windowing User-interface, Ethernet and the Laptop all had essential contributions from a brilliant, visionary, former professional Jazz and Rock guitarist. Alan Kay. His second career as a computer scientist led to him being the creative catalyst at Xerox, Atari and Apple. Alan is driven by the vision of the computer's potential role in education, to build a better society. Read more...

Richard Morris

Luca Cardelli: Geek of the Week

Luca Cardelli is probably best known for Polyphonic C# and Biocomputing, but he has designed a number of experimental languages and published a variety of papers on Theoretical Computing subjects such as type theory and operational semantics. He is now Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research in Cambridge, and head of the Programming Principles and Tools and Security groups. We sent a slightly apprehensive Richard Morris to ask him about DNA Computing Read more...

Richard Morris

Sir Tony Hoare: Geek of the Week

After inventing the QuickSort algorithm, and designing the compiler for the Algol 60 programming language, Tony Hoare went on to apply axiomatic semantics to compiler design and his work and writings have since had a great influence on software engineering, and the way we specify, design, implement, and maintain computer programs. Now, at 75, he is working at Microsoft research on projects that will filter through to .NET languages. Read more...

Richard Morris

Chuck Moore: Geek of the Week

Charles Moore is one of the greatest ever programmers. The 'Forth' language he invented is still in use today, particularly by NASA, and has never been bettered for instrumentation and process control. He still argues persuasively that the only way we can develop effective software quickly is to embrace simplicity. Like Niklaus Wirth, he remains a radical whose views have become increasingly relevant to current software development Read more...

Richard Morris

Richard Stallman: Geek of the Week

Many famous geeks work away at their programs without considering the wider implications of what they, and others, are doing. Richard Stallman isn't like that. Richard (rms) is one of the great brains behind Linux Distros, as he wrote the GNU compilers and GNU debugger. He is driven by strong opinions about the nature of free software, and the restrictive nature of software copyright. We sent our intrepid reporter, Richard Morris, to find out if Richard Stallman really required journalists to read parts of the GNU philosophy before an interview, for "efficiency's sake". Read more...

Richard Morris

Niklaus Wirth: Geek of the Week

It is difficult to begin to estimate the huge extent of the contribution that Niklaus Wirth has made to IT as it exists today. Although now retired for ten years, he remains a abiding influence on the design of computer languages. It is likely that the first structured computer language you ever learned was written by him. He still has fascinating views on contemporary software trends, as Richard Morris found out when he spoke to him. Read more...

Richard Morris

Craig Newmark: Geek of the Week

Occasionally, readers of Simple-Talk will ask quizzically if the 'Geek of the Week' that the editors have chosen really is a true 'geek'. Nobody could ever ask that about Craig Newmark, the founder of the famous website 'CraigsList'. The site is uncompromisingly geeky in attitude, spartan in appearance but immensely popular, and supported by an army of enthusiasts. One can say exactly the same about the admirable Craig Newmark himself. Read more...

Richard Morris

Marc Wick: Geek of the Week

Marc Wick is the genius behind GeoNames, the free Web Service that powers a number of popular GPS applications and games. It is an open-source database of geographical information that is used by hundreds of applications from iPhone apps to political organizations. Its data is used for research and geo-visualizations in universities around the world. It underpins a large number of geography-aware applications and can be loaded into SQL Server Spatial and used with the new geospatial features of SQL Server 2008 Read more...

Richard Morris

Anders Hejlsberg: Geek of the Week

Anders Hejlsberg, the creative genius behind C#, and much of the .NET framework, had already been famous for sixteen years as a compiler-writer before he joined Microsoft twelve years ago. His BLS Pascal, Turbo Pascal, and Delphi had revolutionized the way that we develop software. Today, he is still bubbling with new ideas and radical initiatives. Read more...

Richard Morris

Gail Shaw: Geek of the Week

Gail Shaw, the fabled 'gilamonster', earned her MVP, and the gratitude of a great number of SQL Server professional seeking technical help, through her expert forum posts on SQL Server Central. She brings great enthusiasm to everything she does, including SQL Server, and has come to be a huge influence on the communities she joins. Read more...

Richard Morris

Michael Meeks: Geek of the Week

Richard Morris talks to Michael Meeks, a young Geek who has made a huge impact on the quality of Open source software in the past eight years. He is a Cambridge graduate, a committed Christian, and is modest about his impressive achievements. He gives an interesting interview too! Read more...

Richard Morris

Larry Gonick: Geek of the Week

Cartoonist, mathematician, historian and environmentalist. Larry Gonick proved that learning could be fun by producing a wide range of educational books, all done as comic strips. Many present-day geeks attribute the awakening of their enthusiasm for science to coming across one of Larry's books. Read more...

Richard Morris

Bjarne Stroustrup: Geek of the Week

Without Bjarne Stroustrup, object-oriented programming would have taken much longer to gain mainstream acceptance. Bjarne wrote and popularised 'C with classes', later C++, which changed the way that mainstream computer languages worked. It is still the language of choice for system programmers. Read more...

Richard Morris

Verity Stob: Geek of the Week

Real geeks read Verity Stob. Verity writes her painfully funny invective from a powerful advantage, she is a geek herself, and her humour comes from the pain of every-day life as a programmer. Verity Stob, with her unique, and hilarious, contribution to making our lives bearable, had to be our Geek of the Week. We sent Richard Morris to interview her, of course. Read more...

Richard Morris

'Peli' de Halleux: Geek of the Week

It is extraordinary how much 'Peli' has achieved in a short space of time. Here, our choice for Geek of the Week, 'Peli' de Halleux, talks about his contributions to MbUnit, .NET Reflector, QuickGraph and Pex. Read more...

Richard Morris

Kalen Delaney: Geek of the Week

Kalen Delaney has been involved in SQL Server from the beginning. Her talks and her writings are always interesting but, most important of all, she was able to successfully take on authorship of the 'Inside SQL Server' series of books from Ron Soukup, and make them her own. Despite her own protests that she is a trainer first and foremost, she richly deserves our accolade of 'Geek of the Week' Read more...

Richard Morris

Andrew Tanenbaum: Geek of the Week

Andrew Tanenbaum has had an immense influence on the way that operating systems are designed. He provided the inspiration for Linux, in his lightweight kernel Minix, and his classic textbook 'Operating Systems: Design and Implementation' that Linus Torvalds  described as ‘the book that launched me to new heights.’ Read more...

Richard Morris

Ross Anderson: Geek of the Week

Professor Ross Anderson is one of the foremost experts in Computer Security in the world. He has published widely on the economics of security. cryptology, formal methods, hardware design, and the robustness of distributed systems in general. He is best known for his book 'Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems'. He has never been shy of controversy, and we were intrigued by the influence he wields at Cambridge University; so intrigued  were we that we sent the taciturn Richard Morris to find out more from him Read more...

Richard Morris

Linus Torvalds, Geek of the Week

Linus Torvalds is remarkable, not only for being the technical genius who wrote Linux, but for then being able to inspire and lead an enormous team of people to devote their free time to work on the operating system and bring it to maturity. We sent Richard Morris off to interview Linus, and find out more. Read more...

Richard Morris

Dr Richard Hipp, Geek of the Week

Simple-Talk's Geek of the Week is Dr Richard Hipp. His code is probably running on your PC, and running completely reliably, for he almost single-handedly wrote SQLite, the most widely deployed SQL Database system in the world. Then he put it in the public domain for all of humanity to benefit from. We sent Richard Morris off to ask this remarkable man why he did it. Read more...

Richard Morris

Tim Berners-Lee, Geek of the Week

We interview Simple-Talk's Geek of the Week, Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee OM KBE FRS FREng FRSA. , ranked first in The Telegraph's list of 100 greatest living geniuses, and director of the World Wide Web Consortium. What has he achieved? He invented the World Wide Web, Browsers and Web Servers. You could reasonably argue that he invented Wikis and Blogs too. And he's still inventing things. Read more...

Neil Davidson

Rob Malda, Geek of the Week

Rob Malda, aka CmdrTaco and founder of Slashdot, achieves his elevation to being Simple-Talk's Geek of the Week through his unerring instinct for tracking down what is interesting for his Geek community, and through having the wisdom to continue to immerse himself in deeply technical matters whilst steering the good ship Slashdot. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Kirk Haselden

Author and SQL Server development manager, Kirk Haselden, talks about SSIS, gruelling interviews on an empty stomach, and his role at Microsoft. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Glenn Johnson

Meet Glenn Johnson; he runs Glenn Johnson Technical Training and has just written "Programming Microsoft ADO.NET Applications - Advanced Topics". Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Tom Moreau

"In grad school, I had a temporary assignment as director of the undergrad labs, where I had to manage the grades of 800 students. My predecessor had handled this using a rudimentary Commodore PET program. I re-wrote the program so that it used a very basic DBMS, based on flat files. Not bad for a 32K machine." -- Tom Moreau Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Michael Rys

Dr. Michael Rys is the program manager for the SQL Server Engine Team at Microsoft, represents Microsoft on the W3C XQuery Working Group and has a seat on the SQL Standardization committee. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Dave Sussman

Dave Sussman is one of the ASP Insiders, and a well-known author and speaker. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Peter DeBetta

Peter runs a consulting firm that develops data-driven enterprise solutions, he is also a programming instructor for Wintellect and a frequent speaker on SQL Server and other subjects. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Scott Forsyth

Scott is the director of IT for a premier web hosting company called ORCS Web, and has spent a lot of time working on SQL Server 2005 issues related to that business. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Adam Machanic

Adam is a Microsoft MVP and a Microsoft Certified Professional. He speaks at Code Camps and has just become an independent consultant for SQL Server. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Jim Hoffman

Jim Hoffman is chief operating officer of Innovative Health Solutions, a company that creates web-based solutions for healthcare providers. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Damian Mehers

Damian Mehers created a tool called PromptSQL which brings Intellisense into the SQL Server world. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Linchi Shea

Linchi works at a major Wall Street firm and is responsible for SQL Server product engineering. He is a Microsoft MVP for SQL Server. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Kent Tegels

Kent Tegels is the man behind the Enjoy Every Sandwich blog on sqljunkies.com. He is also an author and an instructor for DevelopMentor. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Gary Mallow

Gary is director of a group of developers who build applications, sometimes using .NET and often using Oracle as a database. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Itzik Ben-Gan

Itzik Ben-Gan is a writer and mentor, he writes a monthly column for SQL Server Magazine and co-authored Advanced Transact-SQL for SQL Server 2000. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Richard Hundhausen

Richard Hundhausen is an author and trainer, he also speaks at conferences such as VSLive and Tech Ed. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Douglas McDowell

Douglas McDowell is the director of operations for business intelligence at Solid Quality Learning, a mentor, solution architect, and project manager.. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week: Rob Howard

Rob Howard is the founder of Telligent Systems who make CommunityServer, previously he was part of the Microsoft .Net team. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Shawn Wildermuth

Shawn Wildermuth is a Microsoft MVP and consultant based in Atlanta, he has also wrote Pragmatic ADO.NET: Data Access for the Internet World and numerous articles. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Bill Vaughn

William Vaughn is a well-known author who writes about Visual Basic and database-related topics. He previously worked for Microsoft, and now runs Beta V Corp. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Bill Bach

Bill Bach, whose company, Goldstar Software, is perhaps the leading source for training and support for users of Btrieve and Pervasive databases. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Bob Beauchemin

Bob Beauchemin is a developer who not only writes code and develops databases, but also teaches other developers to create applications and databases, often using the latest Microsoft technologies. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Rebecca Riordan

Rebecca Riordan has written several books on database design, and understands how to present data for both the database and end users. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Don Demsak

Don Demsak is a developer and consultant who serves the developer community by his participation in user group activities and Code Camps throughout the area. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Wally McClure

In addition to being a Microsoft MVP, Wally is an ASP Insider and one of the authors of a new book from Wrox called Professional ADO.NET 2: Programming with SQL Server 2005, Oracle, and MySQL . Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week - Hilary Cotter

An interview with Hilary Cotter, a specialist in SQL Server full-text search and replication. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Euan Garden

Euan Garden is a Microsoft group program manager for SQL Server, prior to that he spent four years as the manager of Microsoft’s SQL Server Tools development team. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Ken Henderson

Ken is a consultant who often works for high-profile customers, including the U.S. Navy and Air Force, as well as H&R Block. In addition to books, Ken writes articles covering all aspects of SQL Server. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Geek of the Week - Jim Kyle

Jim has been publishing articles related to computers and electronics since at least the early 1960s. He runs a thriving consulting business helping folks repair their Btrieve/Pervasive SQL data files. Read more...

Douglas Reilly

Database Geek of the Week: Terri Morton

Terri Morton is a Senior Programmer/Analyst for MacDirect, a marketing firm in Pennsylvania. She is a Microsoft MVP for ASP.NET as well as an ASP Insider. Read more...

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