Click here to monitor SSC
  • Av rating:
  • Total votes: 27
  • Total comments: 13
Jeff Hewitt

Building Active Directory Wrappers in .NET

09 February 2007

From authenticating application users against Active Directory, to programmatically adding users to Active Directory groups, it seems that a developer in a Microsoft supported environment is never too far away from Active Directory. At least this has been true in my experience. In recent years, there have been many times when I've needed to read or modify values in an Active Directory repository. Each time, I've found myself going back to previous projects or resorting to internet searching, in order to re-learn the steps and components involved.

Eventually, I decided to build a .NET library containing wrappers and components that would allow me to interact with Active Directory without having to remember each time how everything in the System.DirectoryServices namespace works.

This article will explain pieces of this library by walking through how to convert four commonly used Active Directory data types into data types that can be used in a .NET application. It will also explain how to:

  • Retrieve a user from Active Directory using the System.DirectoryServices namespace
  • Read the user's properties
  • Commit any changes back to the Active Directory repository.

The source code for this article (see the Code Download link in the box to the right of the article title) contains the full .NET 2.0 solution, written in Visual Basic.NET. This solution contains two projects: A class library called SimpleTalk_ADDataWrappers which contains the four wrapper classes mentioned above and a console application called TestConsole which retrieves a user from an Active Directory repository and demonstrates how each of the four wrappers can be used. In this article, the wrapper objects and the console application are explained in detail.

The problem with values in Active Directory

At first glance, building this library seemed pretty easy, but I quickly hit my first road block. When you retrieve an object from Active Directory there are no strong typed properties or intellisense to help you get to the information you need. For example, you can't type user.displayName to get the string representing the user's display name. Once you get the user object from the repository, you would access the user's display name as user.properties("displayName") which returns an array of objects. So, not only do you have to know that there is a property on the user object called displayName but also what data type you're expecting it to return, and whether you should expect multiple values or just need to look at the first position in the array.

Having finally mastered displayName, what if you wanted to know when the user had last logged onto the network. You would start by getting the property named lastLogOn which will also return an array of objects. However, the returned data type is a COM object of type Interop.ActiveDs.IADsLargeInteger which is a large integer object with a high and low part representing a date and time. To make easy use of this data it would need to be converted into a Date object, and if you wanted to save it back to the repository it would need to be converted back again.

Aside from IADsLargeInteger, there are three more values that are returned from Active Directory that require some sort of conversion if you want to leverage them in a .NET application:

  1. The object GUID
  2. The object SID
  3. The user account control value.

First, let's look at how to convert the IADsLargeInteger into something that can be easily used.

IADsLargeInteger wrapper

The ADDateTime class in our .NET 2 library wraps the IADsLargeInteger object. Several Active Directory schema properties including accountExpires, badPasswordTime, lastLogon, lastLogoff and passwordExpirationDate return IADsLargeInteger values, all of which can be wrapped using the ADDateTime object.

The wrapper exposes the following three members.

  • Sub New(ByVal ADsLargeInteger As IADsLargeInteger)

The constructor for the wrapper is straight forward and accepts the IADsLargeInteger value from the Active Directory repository.

  • Public ReadOnly Property ADsLargeInteger() As IADsLargeInteger

This read-only property is also fairly straight forward. It exposes the IADsLargeInteger and is used for getting the value back from the wrapper when saving it to the repository.

  • Public Property StandardDateTime() As DateTime

This property exposes the ADsLargeInteger value as a standard .NET DateTime object. The conversions to the underlying IADsLargeInteger are done when the property is invoked (both getting and setting) ensuring that the latest version of the IADsLargeInteger will be returned when reading this property, as well as when invoking the read only ADsLargeInteger property.

The code for the StandardDateTime() property is listed below:

Public Property StandardDateTime() As DateTime
   Get

      Return Me.IADsLargeIntegerToDateTime(Me._ADLI)

   End Get
   Set(ByVal Value As DateTime)

      Me._ADLI = Me.DateTimeToIADsLargeInteger(Value)

   End Set
End
Property

The private member _ADLI is the underlying IADsLargeInteger value. The two methods that this property uses are private methods of the ADDateTime class. These methods convert between IADsLargeInteger values and standard DateTime objects using calls to unmanaged code, and can be found in the source code region IADsLargeInteger CONVERSION METHODS.

ObjectGuid wrapper

The ADObjectGuid object wraps identifier byte arrays returned from Active Directory. Every schema object in Active Directory, including users and groups, is uniquely identified using a string of bytes. This value is returned by the Active Directory schema property objectGuid. Because the identifier values should not be modified, only read only properties are exposed on this class. The ADObjectGuid opbject exposes four members. Firstly, the constructor accepts the 128 bit byte array returned from the Active Directory repository.

      Sub New(ByVal bytes As Byte())

          Me._bytes = bytes

      End Sub

The read only property, bytes, returns the byte array as it was passed into the constructor.

      Public ReadOnly Property bytes() As Byte()
          Get
              Return Me._bytes
          End Get
      End Property

The read only property, guid, returns the byte array in the form of a Guid.

      Public ReadOnly Property guid() As Guid
          Get
              Return New Guid(Me._bytes)
          End Get
      End Property

The read only property, splitOctetString, returns the identifier byte array as an octet string with each byte displayed as a hexadecimal representation and delimited by a '\' character. This format is required when using the System.DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher to search for Active Directory objects by the objectGUID schema property.

      Public ReadOnly Property splitOctetString() As String
          Get

              Dim iterator As Integer
              Dim builder As StringBuilder
              Dim values() As Byte = Me._bytes

              builder = _
    New StringBuilder((values.GetUpperBound(0) + 1) * 2)
              For iterator = 0 To values.GetUpperBound(0)
                  builder.Append("\" & values(iterator).ToString("x2"))
              Next

              Return builder.ToString()

          End Get
      End Property

ObjectSid wrapper

The ADObjectSid object is used to wrap the value of an Active Directory object's objectSid schema property. It is very similar to the ADObjectGuid. In fact, they both have the same constructor and all of the same properties, except ADObjectSid does not have a guid property. That's because the object's SID byte array is 224 bits instead of 128 and cannot be converted to the Guid data type. When an Active Directory object is created, it is assigned a SID value by the system. This value can subsequently be changed by the system but once it changes the system will never again reuse the old value with a different object. Old values are stored in the object's schema property, sidHistory, which returns an object array of SID byte arrays.

Like the ADObjectGuid, the splitOctetString property of the ADObjectSid can also be used in search filters when searching for objects by the object's SID value. This value is also often used when searching for objects by association as the association often references this value.

UserAccountControl wrapper

The ADUserAccountControl object wraps the value of the Active Directory schema property, userAccountControl. The value is simply an integer that represents several different common account control flags. Once you know what the flags are and their values, you only need to perform bitwise operations on the value to set the flag or see if the flag is set. The following snippet from the ADUserAccountControl class is the enumeration of the available flags with their values.

        Public Enum enumUserAccountControlFlag
            SCRIPT = &H1
            ACCOUNT_DISABLED = &H2
            HOMEDIR_REQUIRED = &H8
            LOCKED_OUT = &H10
            PASSWD_NOT_REQD = &H20
            PASSWD_CANT_CHANGE = &H40
            ENCRYPTED_TEXT_PASSWD_ALLWD = &H80
            TEMP_DUPLICATE_ACCT = &H100
            NORMAL_ACCOUNT = &H200
            INTERDOMAIN_TRUST_ACCT = &H800
            WORKSTATION_TRUST_ACCT = &H1000
            SERVER_TRUST_ACCT = &H2000
            PASSWD_NO_EXPIRE = &H10000
            MNS_LOGON_ACCT = &H20000
            SMART_CART_REQD = &H40000
            TRUSTED_FOR_DELEGATION = &H80000
            NOT_DELEGATED = &H100000
            USE_DES_KEY_ONLY = &H200000
            PREAUTH_NOT_REQD = &H400000
            PASSWD_EXPIRED = &H800000
            TRUSTED_TO_AUTH_FOR_DELEGATION = &H1000000
        End Enum

Most of the rest of the class contains public properties, one for each flag above, to set the flag or see if the flag is set. As an example, below, is the code for the LOCKED_OUT property.

        Public Property accountLockedOut() As Boolean
            Get
                Return Me.isFlagSet(enumUserAccountControlFlag.LOCKED_OUT)
            End Get
            Set(ByVal value As Boolean)
                Me.updateFlag(enumUserAccountControlFlag.LOCKED_OUT, value)
            End Set
        End Property

The bitwise operations actually take place in two convenience methods that can be seen used above:

  • isFlagSet, which takes an enumUserAccountControlFlag and returns a Boolean value indicating whether or not the flag is set
  • updateFlag which takes an enumUserAccountControlFlag and a Boolean value, true to set the flag and false to remove it.

Every other flag property of the ADUserAccountControl class is implemented this way as well.

Using the wrapper classes

The TestConsole project included with this article explains how a user can be retrieved from an Active Directory repository, and how the wrapper objects examined above can be leveraged to make useful information out of the data returned from the user's schema properties.

The TestConsole project has the following three references (beyond the default references included when the project is first created):

  1. System.DirectoryServices is used by the application to interact with the Active Directory repository
  2. Interop.ActiveDs contains many of the data types returned from Active Directory
  3. SimpleTalk_ADDataWrappers is the class library containing the wrapper objects described earlier in this article

The Main method of the TestConsole application starts by setting up some configuration variables that will be used during the execution.

Dim repositoryPath As String = "LDAP://yourRepositoryPathGoesHere"
Dim username As String = "usernameOfUserToQuery"
Dim filter As String = _
"(&(objectClass=user)(sAMAccountName=" & username & "))"
Dim ADUsername As String = "ADUsername"
Dim ADPassword As String = "ADPassword"

The repositoryPath string will specify the path to your Active Directory repository. The username string contains the domain username of the user you are going to query. The filter specifies the "query", if you will, that will be executed to find this user. The ADUsername and ADPassword strings specify the credentials for the user that will be used when binding to the user entry that you are searching for in the Active Directory repository.

In the typical domain environment, your domain credentials will give you access to bind to your own user object entry in the Active Directory repository. In other words, depending on your domain's security settings, you may not have access to query any other username in the repository but your own. Therefore, if you run into any problems running the example code, try setting the value of username to your domain username and the values for ADUsername and ADPassword to your domain username and password.

NOTE:
It's worth mentioning at this point that although rare, depending on your domain's security settings, this application may not work at all for your credentials. If you continue to experience problems after a tweaking the configuration variables a few times, you may need to contact your system administrator to gain the necessary access.

Once the configuration variables have the correct values, the application can initialize the directory service objects.

Dim repositoryRootEntry As New _
DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry(repositoryPath, _
ADUsername, ADPassword)

Dim directorySearcher As New _
DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher(repositoryRootEntry, filter)

The repositoryRootEntry will be the starting location in the search. In my case, when I instantiated the repositoryRootEntry, I passed in the path to the root of my domain's Active Directory tree and the administrator's username and password. The directorySearcher is used in executing searches against an entry, in our case the repositoryRootEntry using the specified filter.

Next, the application executes the search by invoking the directorySearcher's FindOne method to return a DirectoryServices.SearchResult object:

Dim result As DirectoryServices.SearchResult = _
directorySearcher.FindOne()

The directorySearcher also exposes a FindAll method which returns a DirectoryServices.SearchResultCollection. The FindOne method is used in this case because there is only one user in the repository that has the specified username. So, if the number of return results can be expected to be only one, the FindOne method can be used, otherwise use FindAll. Also, note that the rest of the code is wrapped in a Try/Catch block, because from this point on if anything is going to go wrong it will happen once the connection to the repository is made.

If the result is not null, then the directorySearcher succeeded in finding the user, which will be returned as a DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry.

Dim user As DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry = result.GetDirectoryEntry

The remaining four method calls test the four wrapper methods described earlier in the article. Since they are all similar, let's look at the testADObjectGuid in detail.

        ' object guid
        Dim value As Object = getProperty(user, "objectGUID")
        If Not value Is Nothing Then
            Dim wraper As New ADObjectGuid(value)
Console.WriteLine("User's Guid Identifier:" & _
ControlChars.Tab & ControlChars.Tab & _
ControlChars.Tab & wraper.guid.ToString)
Console.WriteLine("User's Split Octet Identifier:" &_
ControlChars.Tab & ControlChars.Tab & wraper.splitOctetString.ToString)
        Else
Console.WriteLine("Something is wrong - this user has no unique identifier.")
        End If

It may look like more code than necessary, but that's because the ControlChars end up bloating the Console.WriteLine lines. First, the value is retrieved using another method in the module, getProperty, which takes the user DirectoryEntry and the name of the property to retrieve, in this case, objectGUID. If getProperty returns nothing then a message is printed. Otherwise, the value object is loaded into a new ADObjectGuid wrapper object. Finally, the method writes the Guid and the split octet string representations of the identifier to the console.

The getProperty function is used to retrieve the value because it takes a few lines of code to get just one value from an entry. That's because, as mentioned earlier, when you request a property from a DirectoryEntry it returns an array of objects. All of the properties being requested in this module are only expected to return one value. So, this function extracts that value from the first index of the array returned. The code for the getProperty function is listed below.

    Private Function getProperty _
(ByVal user As DirectoryServices.DirectoryEntry, _
       ByVal propertyName As String) As Object
            If user.Properties.Contains(propertyName) Then
Dim
properties As _ DirectoryServices.PropertyValueCollection = _
user.Properties(propertyName)
            Return properties(0)
           End If
           Return Nothing
    End Function

Notice that before the function actually requests the value from the directoryEntry, it first checks to see if the entry contains the property. Although the schema may support a property on the entry, if the entry doesn't have a value for that property, it won't exist.

The properties that the entry has values for can be obtained by invoking DirectoryEntry.Properties.PropertyNames, which is an array of strings representing the property names of the properties that have values for the specific entry. There are actually several hundred properties available for many types of DirectoryEntry objects. A list of the properties can be obtained programmatically including information about which properties are mandatory and which are optional. However, this being outside of the scope for this article, to find out more information go to:

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms675085.aspx.

Updating the Active Directory entry

If you have downloaded the solution, you may have already noticed that there is one more method call commented out after the four tests. The updateUserEmailAddress method accepts the user DirectoryEntry and a new email address string. Before you uncomment this method, it may be a good idea to contact your network administrator to ensure that updating Active Directory properties won't have adverse effects on the other systems running on the network. For example, there may be a system on your network, like a spam filter or scheduled task that is expecting a certain user's email address to be a certain value. If this value is changed, this system may not be able to send out a notification to that user.

First, the method retrieves the user's email address, just as for the previous four tests, by calling the getProperty function and passing in the user and the property name mail, which returns the user's email address. Once it has the email address, it writes the current address to the console and then writes the newEmailAddress to the console. Then the user's email address is updated to the repository using the following code.

user.Properties("mail")(0) = newEmailAddress
      user.CommitChanges()

When using the wrapper classes, the values are saved back to the repository in the same way. Simply replace the newEmailAddress value with the underlying value of the wrapper object. For example, updating the accountExpires property of a user would look like this:

user.Properties("accountExpires")(0) = _
ADDateTimeWrapper.ADsLargeInteger     
user.CommitChanges()

At this point, an exception may be thrown if the ADUsername and ADPassword do not belong to a user with sufficient rights to update the entry's properties. Typically, as mentioned earlier, users have sufficient rights to bind to and read from their own entries but not enough rights to commit changes to the entry. Depending on your domain security settings you may experience varied results when invoking this method.

To make sure that the change worked, if you have access to actually view the Active Directory users and computers on your network, you will see that the email address for the given user has been updated. If you don't have access, you can run the TestConsole a second time and see what email address is written to the console before the email address is changed.

Things to keep in mind

While experimenting with this code, keep in mind that the scenarios described here may not work if the user being used to bind to the Active Directory entries does not have sufficient rights. Further, even if the user does have sufficient rights to read, the user may not have sufficient rights to commit changes. In the end, although the examples described in this article are pretty straight forward, different users may experience varying experiences based on the domain's security settings. For example, by default, administrators are the only users on the domain with sufficient rights to update a user entry. If this is the case on your domain, if you are not an administrator, the updateUserEmailAddress method will fail with an UnauthorizedAccessException error, when it calls user.commitChanges. For more information on best practices and how to modify Active Directory security settings visit:

http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/373a4e2b-89a6-4ccc-9e20-be07c741f47b1033.mspx?mfr=true

Also, not all properties can be directly updated. For example, using the ADUserAccountControl wrapper to update the PASSWD_CANT_CHANGE flag will not actually change whether or not the user's password can be modified. In addition, depending on the state of the entry (disabled, password expired, etc.), some properties may be read only and although it may look like the changes have been committed, they have not. I've discovered some of these anomalies from my own experimentation and have tried to document the code where I have encountered these situations.

Conclusion – possible improvements or additions

I believe this code is a great foundation for anyone wanting to gain a deeper expertise on leveraging an Active Directory repository in a .NET application. However, as anyone reading this article can see, there are several areas for improvements and additions. One glaring issue that I have struggled with is the fact that under different scenarios in addition to insufficient access rights, this code may not work as expected or at all. Every domain is different and different user states require different implementations of the code described in this article. For example, as mentioned in the latter section, although some of these user states may be predictable, writing code that can detect and work through some of these situations is outside of the scope of this article.

Also, now that this article describes how to wrap different data types returned from Active Directory repositories, it may be nice to have a wrapper object for wrapping an entire Active Directory user entry or even a group entry.

Jeff Hewitt

Author profile:

Jeff Hewitt is a senior consultant with Credera (http://www.credera.com), a full service business and technology consulting firm in Dallas Texas. He specializes in Microsoft Technologies specifically Windows forms and ASP.NET application design and development. He is also a capable Java developer and enjoys tinkering with open source projects.

Search for other articles by Jeff Hewitt

Rate this article:   Avg rating: from a total of 27 votes.


Poor

OK

Good

Great

Must read
Have Your Say
Do you have an opinion on this article? Then add your comment below:
You must be logged in to post to this forum

Click here to log in.


Subject: Question
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 at 10:55 AM
Message: First off, great article.
Do you know of the bitwise info for the enum: enumUserAccountControlFlag, i need to find out from the domain password policy:
A. Minimum password length required by domain policy,
B. This password history requirement (like num days you must keep password before changing it again,
C. Whether strong password is needed flag..

I need to read this out of our AD domain password policy if possible.
Any help would be great!
thanks.

Subject: Question about AD password policy
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 at 11:00 AM
Message: First off, great article.
Do you know of the bitwise info for the enum: enumUserAccountControlFlag, i need to find out from the domain password policy:
A. Minimum password length required by domain policy,
B. This password history requirement (like num days you must keep password before changing it again,
C. Whether strong password is needed flag..

I need to read this out of our AD domain password policy if possible.
Any help would be great!
thanks.

Subject: I figured out the last question thanks.
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 at 5:03 PM
Message: For those interested in how i did it:
http://www.awprofessional.com/articles/article.asp?p=474649&seqNum=3&rl=1

Subject: Octet Strings are the devils work
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Monday, March 05, 2007 at 1:57 AM
Message: Anyone wanting to retrieve an objectGUID from a newly created object should not bother with byte and octet string nonsense.

Just cast from a byte array to a guid and then to a string. Eg.

Guid g = new Guid((byte[])oNewGroup.Properties["objectGUID"][0]);

sReturn = g.ToString();

Subject: Come down a bit
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, March 14, 2007 at 3:43 PM
Message: Your article leaves A LOT up to the limited knowledge of inexperienced programmers, and the code samples are formatted in a way that cannot even be copied and pasted without 3 way conversion.

Subject: A certain property
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Thursday, March 22, 2007 at 4:56 PM
Message: I've been searching to find the DOMAIN name of a user as it is displayed in the User object dialog (PRE-Win2000). Is there a way to find this ?
Thanks,
Bart
PS. Don't bother with extremely inexperienced programmers, as they shouldn't start off by programming AD anyways, imho.

Subject: RE: A certain property
Posted by: jhewitt (view profile)
Posted on: Friday, March 23, 2007 at 9:37 AM
Message: The "sAMAccountName" attribute that we are using to search for the user in the example code is commonly called the pre-windows 2000 logon name. It is similar to the CN (Common Name) attribute in post-windows 2000. However, in post-windows 2000 you should be able to access both attributes. For example, if I use "domain\username" to log into my domain, then I can find the user named "username" by searching with the "sAMAccountName" attribute.
I'm a little confused when you say "User object dialog". If the user's "display name" is what you are looking for, use the AD attribute "displayName" which gives you "firstName lastName". I hope this helps.

Subject: RE: A certain property
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 at 3:06 AM
Message: Thanks for your response, Jeff.
What I actually need is this. I'm writing a web service that returns user data when searching for a user account. I would like to return the sAMAccountName, the domain, the displayname and the email address for every object that satisfies the search argument. The problem is, that when I search in the GC:// (or in a specific domain with an LDAP:// for that matter) I cannot find any property that gives me the domain (in the short form as in "domain\username") or a property from which I can derive it reliably (I took the first DC= from the distinguishedname, which is not allways correct)

Furthermore, I would like to narrow my search when the argument contains a domain ("domain\user") to the domain specified, But there again I need a way to translate this domain into our 4-part DC=xxx,... string.
Thanks,
Bart

Subject: RE: A certain property
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 at 4:05 AM
Message: Thanks for your response, Jeff.
What I actually need is this. I'm writing a web service that returns user data when searching for a user account. I would like to return the sAMAccountName, the domain, the displayname and the email address for every object that satisfies the search argument. The problem is, that when I search in the GC:// (or in a specific domain with an LDAP:// for that matter) I cannot find any property that gives me the domain (in the short form as in "domain\username") or a property from which I can derive it reliably (I took the first DC= from the distinguishedname, which is not allways correct)

Furthermore, I would like to narrow my search when the argument contains a domain ("domain\user") to the domain specified, But there again I need a way to translate this domain into our 4-part DC=xxx,... string.
Thanks,
Bart

Subject: That certain property
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, March 28, 2007 at 6:47 AM
Message: (excuses for the double post)
Apparently the short domain name is not an AD property, it is the NetBios name of the domain. The easiest way is to hard-code a list of short (netbios) and long (AD) domain names and search in that for a translation to the other.
Thanks,
Bart

Subject: Dim results As SearchResult = oDirectorySearcher.FindOne()
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Wednesday, June 13, 2007 at 5:06 PM
Message: Hi Jeff,

The method FindOne fails, I have set up the
"usernameToSearchWith"
"passwordToSearchWith"

As Domain Admins on the AD.

Please advice.

Thanks
PM

Subject: Cool one
Posted by: Raffaeu (not signed in)
Posted on: Tuesday, December 04, 2007 at 6:06 AM
Message: I found your article very interesting for me and for what i'm doing, otherwise it sould be better if you'll write in the future also with C#, don't you think? :-)

Subject: Active Directory Wrapper
Posted by: Anonymous (not signed in)
Posted on: Friday, April 18, 2008 at 4:43 PM
Message: Ive created an wrapper for the active directory, which is usable in all .NET applications.

http://www.activedirectorywrapper.net

 

Top Rated

Acceptance Testing with FitNesse: Multiplicities and Comparisons
 FitNesse is one of the most popular tools for unit testing since it is designed with a Wiki-style... Read more...

Acceptance Testing with FitNesse: Symbols, Variables and Code-behind Styles
 Although FitNesse can be used as a generic automated testing tool for both applications and databases,... Read more...

Acceptance Testing with FitNesse: Documentation and Infrastructure
 FitNesse is a popular general-purpose wiki-based framework for writing acceptance tests for software... Read more...

TortoiseSVN and Subversion Cookbook Part 11: Subversion and Oracle
 It is only recently that the tools have existed to make source-control easy for database developers.... Read more...

TortoiseSVN and Subversion Cookbook Part 10: Extending the reach of Subversion
 Subversion provides a good way of source-controlling a database, but many operations are best done from... Read more...

Most Viewed

A Complete URL Rewriting Solution for ASP.NET 2.0
 Ever wondered whether it's possible to create neater URLS, free of bulky Query String parameters?... Read more...

Visual Studio Setup - projects and custom actions
 This article describes the kinds of custom actions that can be used in your Visual Studio setup project. Read more...

.NET Application Architecture: the Data Access Layer
 Find out how to design a robust data access layer for your .NET applications. Read more...

Calling Cross Domain Web Services in AJAX
 The latest craze for mashups involves making cross-domain calls to Web Services from APIs made publicly... Read more...

Web Parts in ASP.NET 2.0
 Most Web Parts implementations allow users to create a single portal page where they can personalize... Read more...

Why Join

Over 400,000 Microsoft professionals subscribe to the Simple-Talk technical journal. Join today, it's fast, simple, free and secure.