.NET

25 August 2016

Taking Pictures from HTML

Sometimes a request from a user who doesn't appreciate the limitations of the technology can jolt you into discovering that an application feature that was, until recently, difficult to achieve is suddenly relatively easy. Dino was asked to allow the user to take photographs and associate them with an item of work. After he'd recovered from the shock, he decided that it was achievable, and now describes how he went on and did it.… Read more
25 July 2016

Performance-Oriented Software Development

Applications must perform well. The problem is that performance can't easily be added later as an afterthought but must be part of the culture and values of the development team. This isn't easy, particularly if measurement is difficult to achieve and it is tricky to determine exactly what is running too slowly. As well as making performance a clear objective, you need an efficient integrated approach and the right tools. If you get this right, it can save a lot of expense, and time spent refactoring code. … Read more
18 July 2016

Accepting Dates in Web Pages

Surely, not much could be simpler than using the HTML INPUT element? Actually, it was always a trouble for dates, what with having to check dates for validity and coping with all the languages and conventions. Now with HTML5, the 'date' type, and so many date-pickers that are either built-in or part of frameworks, it can become a complex decision about how you best deal with date input. Dino explains the issues of inputting dates into web applications.… Read more
20 June 2016

Crossing the Site Domain with JavaScript

Browsers try to prevent a range of malicious attacks by preventing content being accessed by a web page from a different domain to the one that the page was fetched from. If you have a legitimate need to do this, it is a bad idea to disable this method of defence: Instead, there are more legitimate and safer ways of performing cross-domain JavaScript calls such as JSONP or Cross-Origin Resource Sharing, as Dino explains.… Read more
16 June 2016

A Real-World React.js Setup for ASP.NET Core and MVC5

React is a front-end user interface library developed by Facebook, originally to help them improve their own site. Since then it has grown into somewhat of a phenomenon, with many active users. In this article, Jon Smith provides multiple examples of how to use React with recently released ASP.NET Core MVC, and the existing ASP.NET MVC5 framework.… Read more
24 May 2016

The Plain Simple Password Page Not So Simple Anymore

The requirements for the management of passwords have become far more complex over the past few years in response to the increasing sophistication of security breaches. Nowadays, you need to provide a range of features such as hashing, routine change of passwords, preventiion of repeat passwords, email confirmation, auto-generation of random passwords and password quality checks. Dino Esposito explains.… Read more
18 May 2016

How to Build a Search Page with Elasticsearch and .NET

Although SQL Server's Full-Text search is good for searching text that is within a database, there are better ways of implementing search if the text is less-well structured, or comes from a wide variety of sources or formats. Ryszard takes ElasticSearch, and seven million questions from StackOverflow, in order to show you how to get started with one of the most popular search engines around.… Read more
13 April 2016

ASP.NET Core: A More Realistic Starter Kit

ASP.NET Core is a fascinating platform with many good ideas, but in its present form (RC1)there is a culture shock for experienced ASP.NET developers to experience the effort involved in porting a realistic application. There is an obvious advantage in being able to host an application on any web server, but is this enough to compensate for losing the convenience of an integrated pipeline?… Read more
16 March 2016

Posting Form Content via JavaScript

Web-based applications run smoother if instead of using the traditional form method, they use JavaScript to post data to the server and to update the user interface after posting data: It also makes it easier to keep POST and GET actions separated. SignalR makes it even slicker; it can even update multiple pages at the same time. Is it time to use JavaScript to post data rather than posting via the browser the traditional way?… Read more
23 February 2016

Introduction to Bower, Grunt, and Gulp in Visual Studio

Developers are now spending much more time writing and debugging JavaScript, CSS, HTML templates etc. Microsoft have responded by adding better tools for front-end development into their development environment, Visual Studio. In this article Jon Smith uses a sample application to demonstrate how he converted an existing ASP.NET MVC5 application to use these new tools… Read more
16 February 2016

Keeping POST and GET Separated

The occasional problems that you can get with POST and GET are typical of the difficulties of separating any command and query operations. This separation is tricky to achieve, at least in ASP.NET MVC. Dino suggests some ways of avoiding errors and minimising the confusing warning messages.… Read more
26 January 2016

Maintaining T-SQL Code Quality Using SQL Code Guard

Sometimes you need some functionality in your database build process that isn't quite available. Visual Studio Database projects don't have great ways of reviewing SQL code for potential errors, but is it possible to adapt a good command-line tool like SQL Code Guard that does the job well? Lukasz shows how to do it by using NuGet packages to integrate such tools with the project and the build process.… Read more
13 January 2016

Data Manipulation in R: Beyond SQL

Although SQL is an obvious choice for retrieving the data for analysis, it strays outside its comfort zone when dealing with pivots and matrix manipulations. R includes a number of packages that can do these simply. By combining the two, you can prepare your data for analysis or visualisation in R more efficiently.… Read more
07 January 2016

How to Take an Asp.Net MVC Web Site Down for Maintenance

Keeping a customer facing web site up and performing well is a challenge, especially when you are still adding new features. While providing an "always on" experience for users is preferred there are times when it is easier to take the site "down for maintenance" and fix those things that are just too difficult and costly to do with the site up. Jon Smith describes his solution to a controlled "down for maintenance" approach for ASP.NET MVC sites.… Read more

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