Under the Hood of .NET Memory Management

As well-engineered as the .NET framework is, it's not perfect, and it doesn't always get memory management right. To write truly fantastic software, you need to understand how .NET memory management actually works. This book will take you from the very basics of memory management, all the way to how the OS handles its resources, and will help you write the best code you can.

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As well-engineered as the .NET framework is, it’s not perfect, and it doesn’t always get memory management right. To write truly fantastic software, you need to understand how .NET memory management actually works. This book will take you from the very basics of memory management, all the way to how the OS handles its resources, and will help you write the best code you can.

Chris Farrell and Nick Harrison have both been working with the .NET framework since day one, and bring all their experience to bear in this book as they explain:

  • How the .NET framework manages memory
  • How to avoid writing unnecessarily resource-hungry code
  • How to fix your applications’ memory troubles

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  • jinal

    Need some more detail
    Although book is very very informative and it would be great book if following topics included.
    1. Why heap and stack is different as both present in RAM ?
    2. Remoting object Garbage Collection
    3. Distributed system and its Garbage Collection
    4. SQL CLR Garbage Collection

  • greenstone

    .NET applications using files instead of embedded resources
    Hi Chris,

    I enjoyed reading you book. Great work!

    A question about your suggested practice of "using content instead of embedded resources for larger artifact"…

    Is the issue that the embedded resources are all loaded into memory run-time. Are they sitting in managed or unmanaged memory? If managed, are they eventually elevated to Gen 2?

    Any general idea of what size you might consider "larger artifacts"?

    Any general thoughts about how often a resource is accessed, to whether it’s better to remain on disk (ASP.NET) -vs- embedded resources?

    Thanks!

    greenstone

  • jegaonkarsachin

    Regarding the Book
    This book is really good to get a deeper insight into .NET memory management.

    One Must Have this Title.