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2008 June


Tony Davis

SQL Server Tumbleweed Awards

4 comments

Several parts of SQL Server look as though they were started and then suddenly abandoned. The classic example is the TEXT datatype. Phil Factor has a theory on most things, and in this case it’s that the programmer responsible for implementing the TEXT datatype at Microsoft succumbed to the unbearable pressure of the job, one […]

24 June 2008 8:35 am by
red@work

Thank you to the .NET Developer Group in Braunschweig

1 comment

At Red Gate we have a ‘Memory Wall’ that proudly displays a number of Red Gate’s finest (and not so finest!) moments over the past eight years. We have some super photos of our joint CEO, Neil Davidson, looking like a fresh-faced university graduate, and some even better ones of my favourite Project Manager, Bart […]

24 June 2008 8:03 am by
red@work

How to make friends – by Red Gate

1 comment

Red Gate, to the untrained eye, looks a lot like other companies. We are departmentalised, we are spread over multiple offices, and we sometimes don’t know what other areas of the company are up to (note to Sara – when do we find out what “activities” we will be taking part in at the Red […]

24 June 2008 6:54 am by
Andras Belokosztolszki

SQL Server 2008: new data types and .Net 2 with and without SP1

4 comments

SQL Server 2008 has introduced a few new data types, among others the new date types, like date, time, datatime2 and datetimespan. Because .Net 2 was released before SQL Server 2008 has introduced these data types, there are no classes that map to these new types in .Net 2. But this has changed with .Net […]

20 June 2008 7:05 am by
Phil Factor

The biggest secret?

4 comments

The first programmable computer was invented by Charles Babbage and Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace. Charles Babbage’s story is so well known that I don’t need to relate it to you. I also believe that it isn’t completely true. It conceals a secret. We now, of course, are almost certain what part of that […]

13 June 2008 7:22 am by
Phil Factor

Common Law, and The need for restraint.

3 comments

I’ll never forget the best DBA I ever appointed, because he thoughtfully taught me an effective technique for removing wheel-clamps from cars. It was after the interview, I seem to remember. We walked together to his car to get a file. There in the boot was some interesting equipment collected together to meet the needs […]

9 June 2008 4:57 am by
Tony Davis

CLR, beer and turkey

21 comments

It is strange that two important programming techniques in a SQL Server Database can’t be done in TSQL. The first is, of course, being able to read multiple results from a stored procedure. You can do it in ODBC/ADO and so on, but not in TSQL. The other obvious failing is that one cannot write […]

6 June 2008 4:07 am by
Bart Read

New in ANTS Profiler 4 EA: ASP.NET support

0 comments

I know a lot of you have been waiting for this, so I’m pleased to be able to tell you that we’ve now integrated support for ASP.NET web applications and web services into ANTS Profiler 4. This goes for both IIS and Web Development Server, so if you’re looking for this support, you can find […]

5 June 2008 9:35 am by
Jason Crease

ANTS Performance Profiler 4 = Sexy Software!?

2 comments

I sit next to this guy called Stephen Chambers. He is the Usability Engineer working on our next version of our code profiler, ANTS Performance Profiler 4. He is completely revising the UI of ANTS Profiler, and spends most of his time phoning developers asking what they would like to see in the next version, […]

3 June 2008 5:46 pm by
Jason Crease

Order of Construction

3 comments

  For me, inheritance is often a headache.  In particular, in what order is everything initialized?  Consider this short C# program.   It creates an instance of Dog, which derives from Animal.  Both Dog and Animal have an instance constructor, a class initializer (aka a static constructor), an instance variable, and a static variable.  using System; namespace CtorOrder […]

2 June 2008 10:05 am by